New books: INSTAGRAM

THIS BOOK IS A SEQUEL, OF SORTS, TO SQUARE – THE MOST PERSONAL OF THE TRIO OF BOOKS I PUBLISHED LAST YEAR. It might be even more personal; unlike SQUARE, which included studio still life work and by-products and leftovers from travel gigs, this is really a collection of snapshots – photos taken with the most simple, easy to use cameras I’ve ever used: My cellphones.

All of my cellphones, in order

I’m not sure when I took my first cellphone pic. It might have been with the third phone I owned – a Palm Trio built for texting that I never did. I mostly used my phone to take notes for locations; Instagram launched in 2010, but I didn’t open my first account until January of 2015.

I took a lot of time matching shots for the spreads in this book. The shot on the left was taken in an industrial park in a Toronto suburb. The one on the right was shot in Montana. I like to think that they both suggest a bit of a story that the viewer will try to fill in for themselves.

The snapshot of Irving Penn’s painted backdrop, taken during a trip to New York to see his big retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, screamed out for a portrait on the facing page, but I almost never shoot portraits with my cellphone. (Don’t ask me why.) I did, however, have a photo I took of a wooden sculpture – a portrait of an African chieftain in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Instagram is full of a lot of types of photos. There are selfies, of course (which I don’t take) and shots of food (which I have taken, rarely.) Most of all, though I think it’s a platform for people to share their travel photos, and I’m no different. This spread suggested itself – two different views of airplane travel, shot from plane windows. Like the two photos below, they’re quick grabs at capturing something ephemeral, and that mix of loneliness and wonder I find so compelling about travel.

Every new generation of cellphone I’ve had has improved camera image quality immensely. Shooting a professional gig on a cellphone is still a bit of a stunt today, but I can imagine a day when it will be completely normal. Perversely, this is why I decided to publish cellphone pics in the book with the highest printing quality (and highest price – $20) of all the books I’ve made so far. I’m pretty certain that the next book I do will move on from magazine to book format, so INSTAGRAM was a tentative test of what I can expect to see.

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