Spring

Spring #1 (from a neighbour’s tree), Toronto, May 2020

SPRING HAS BEEN TEASING US WHILE WE’RE STILL LOCKED DOWN. They say April is the cruelest month, but May is trying to compete, alternating between a few lovely warm days and then sleet, wind chill and frost warnings. There’s some sort of end in sight – maybe – which somehow makes the budding trees and early perennials pressing forward despite the weather even more poignant.

For weeks, of course, it was all just grey dirt and unraked leaves and the dried husks of last year’s flowers, still standing after the snow. They felt appropriate at the start of the era of social distancing.

Spring (coneflower husk), Toronto, May 2020

And then the first buds started to appear in the parks and yards, looking as surreptitious as we felt, breaking quarantine and heading out to get some sun and air.

Spring #2 & #3, Toronto, May 2020

I’ll give the lockdown some credit – I never would have noticed all this abundance, in all of its shapes and colours, if I hadn’t been stuck at home, desperate for material to photograph, and strangely, newly aware of everything I was seeing on my walks and hikes.

Spring #4, Toronto, May 2020
Spring (Blackcurrants), Toronto, May 2020
Spring #5, Toronto, May 2020
Spring #6, Toronto, May 2020
Spring #7, Toronto, May 2020

I’ve been desperate for subjects, and having run out of flowers I went for a walk with a pair of secateurs to harvest some cuttings in our backyard, and off the trees and bushes along the rail corridor by our house. Without their leaves, I couldn’t tell you what you’re looking at – perhaps a botany enthusiast reading this could hazard some guesses. Everything here was photographed in the lockdown kitchen studio, even if it might look like it was taken outside against a cloudless sky.

Spring #8 (before), Toronto, May 2020
Spring #9 (after), Toronto, May 2020

The two frames above are a testament to how robustly the new life is seeking a fresh start – the second photo is of the same cutting after spending a few days sitting in a glass of water in our kitchen. Even without roots, the imperative is to bud and grow, in whatever circumstances might be even slightly optimistic.

The shots below are little personal landmarks. The cutting from a neighbour’s tree was taken with his permission – it’s a tree that explodes in flowers every year when spring is finally established, covering the sidewalk with confetti-like petals just before the lilacs start to bloom. The one at the bottom is our own apple tree, a multi-grafted sapling that I planted a few years ago, in honour of the one my grandfather planted in the backyard of our house in Mount Dennis.

Spring #10 (from a neighbour’s tree), Toronto, May 2020
Spring #11 (Apple blossom), Toronto, May 2020
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3 thoughts on “Spring

  1. jannybea May 13, 2020 / 5:37 pm

    These are lovely, evocative of possibility: Spring!

    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

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